Live and Let Bee by D S Nelson

Screen Shot 2016-04-06 at 17.55.194 Stars from me

The prose in Live and Let Bee has an old fashioned feel to it, like the old Sherlock Holmes, Marple, Murder She Wrote, Midsomer style tales. It is very endearing and tension builds slowly but surely as the pages turn.

It took me a few chapters to get used to this slower pace (I am more used to the break neck speeds of Simon Kernick!), but I genuinely enjoyed the softer style of D S Nelson and a more whimsical take on what could otherwise have been a killing spree!

I can well imagine this being televised, much akin to the popular series’ that I’ve mentioned above. Ideal Sunday afternoon viewing with a nice cup of tea and pleasant company.

Don’t be mislead however, this story does build and I soon found myself racing through the pages to get to the end and discover who the murderer was.

There is strong reference to bees throughout the book which was integral to the story and which I quite liked, with a little snippet of bee related information at the beginning of each chapter.

Constructive criticism from me would be to change the cover image/style as it doesn’t do the book justice.

Synopsis: ‘Honey is sweet, but the bee stings’ and Blake Hetherington knows this only too well. Blake is a gentleman in modern times; a milliner with mystery solving thrust upon him. Delilah is an enthusiastic archaeologist with an unhealthy interest in murder; DS Rob Claringdon is her beau. This unlikely trio is at the heart of a quirky, amusing and quintessentially English, murder mystery.

‘Live and Let Bee’, finds our heroes on a remote feudal island to celebrate a wedding, but after two mysterious deaths, are they able to resist investigating a case that involves warring honey farms, Russian oligarchs and a dark family secret?

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